Language learning

Manga Recommendation: 日本人の知らない日本語

Today’s recommendation is manga series called 日本人の知らない日本語 (nihonjin no shiranai nihongo) by Nagiko Umino. Despite the meaning of the title (something along the lines of ‘The Japanese langauge that Japanese people don’t know’), this is a highly recommended manga for students of Japanese.

The manga is written from the perspective of Nagiko, who works as a Japanese language teacher. The manga focuses on her experiences of teaching international students Japanese and what she learns about her native language in the process.

You are bound to find at least one story that you can relate to as a Japanese language learner. It is often funny, but manages to always be sympathetic to the plight of the international students whilst being incredibly informative.

Each chapter normally begins with one of the international students posing a question about an aspect of the language. Nagako often responds by explaining the history behind this aspect of the language as part of her answer. For example, there is a chapter about the origin of hiragana and katakana which I found particularly fascinating.

Hentaigana-ha1.svg
It turns out that hentaigana like the above were in use until the 20th century!

Having this historical background really helps to flesh out how the language has developed into its current state and help you remember the Japanese correctly.

At the end of each story there is a mini essay about the topic covered, normally emphasising to the Japanese audience this is aimed at what struggles learners of Japanese often have and why. There are also mini quizzes testing you on an aspect of the language covered in the chapter (with answers). From a learners perspective this is a good way of checking that you’ve understood what was covered.

In terms of language level I think JLPT N3 level and above learners will get the most out of all of the content (including the mini essays at the end of each chapter). N4 level learners however may be able to follow a lot of the dialogue with help from a dictionary. Reading this manga may just help you avoid the pitfalls that a lot of us fall into on our language journeys!

If you find the manga a bit too tricky, there is a drama adaptation that aired in 2010 which is also worth a watch. If you do watch the drama, you might want to check out the drama’s official website which recaps the main grammar points and vocab from each episode.

Have you read this manga or watched the drama? Let me know your thoughts in the comments.

 

On Reaching Your Language Goals

So we have reached July, and hopefully I am not the only one wondering where the first 6 months have gone. Now is as good time as any to look back on the first half of the year and review any targets you have set for the year.

Do you remember what your new year’s resolutions were?

Have you not got round to setting them yet?

The problem with new year’s resolutions is that they are often too big and too vague to actually achieve. I suggest that if you are reviewing your resolutions or setting goals for the first time this year to do two things:

1) Break them down into smaller, more concrete goals

2) Work out what steps you need to take to achieve them

For example, if your goal this year was to learn Japanese, I want you to think about what it is about Japanese you want to master. Do you want to be able to understand an anime, travel to Japan, read a Murakami novel in the original language or something completely different? It is important to think about this because the nature of your goal will ultimately determine your approach to learning Japanese. All of the previous examples would require would require a different emphasis on listening, speaking and reading respectively and reflect varying levels of proficiency in Japanese.

Now that you have thought about what it is you want to achieve, think about the timescale you want to set to achieve these goals. Some goals will have a more clear cut end date – If your trip to Japan is to see the cherry blossoms in Kyoto then you probably have until next March to study, and if you’re sitting the JLPT then you would be looking towards the next sitting of the test in your country.

If an end date for your goals is not clear cut, then I suggest looking at a monthly check in. If your goals are language related, keeping a journal of what you have learnt will make it easy to review what you have learnt at the end of the month and to set targets for the next month. This is especially good where your target is a longer term goal (like learning to read Murakami).

With your smaller goals in mind, you next need to think about how you are actually going to achieve it. This is often the trickiest part, but is also the step that will ensure you keep on track. In regards to learning Japanese, this would relate to which resources are you going to use to learn basic phrases, kana, kanji and grammar.

Netflix_Logo_DigitalVideo_0701
Fortunately even lazing around on Netflix can count as language learning 😉

The great thing about language learning in general is that there is a great range of activites that double up as language study. However the type of language learning activities you focus on need to be targeted towards your goal – learning kanji isn’t going to be necessary for a short trip to Japan but is essential for understanding Murakami! Do you have a Japanese friend that you can practise with? Is there a Japanese class in your area you can attend? Are there beginners textbooks you can lend from a local library? This may feel like an expensive endeavour but there are lots of free resources out there – most of the resources I recommend on this blog are free.

Finally consider when in your day you will realistically be able to fit in language learning activities and work around this. Make it your aim to fit in at least one activity a day, because consistency reaps the most rewards with language learning. I find that bullet journals or to do list apps such as Bright Todo are useful for keeping yourself accountable for maintaining, although setting daily reminders in your preferred calendar app works just as well.

If you can set yourself small goals and put together a realistic plan of how to go about achieving them, the world really is your oyster when it comes to learning Japanese, or any language for that matter. I’ll leave you with one last quote which I think ties in really well with today’s topic:

“The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”

‘Appy Mondays: Mondo App Review

Welcome to my series of app reviews relating to Japanese language study. Today’s app review is of the Japanese reading app Mondo.

Have you been studying Japanese for a while but scared of reading articles in Japanese? Looking for a simple Japanese news aggregate app with dictionary lookup functionality? Then Mondo is definitely the app for you!

mondo_featuredimage-620x390

I have had this app installed for some time, but after playing around with the app to understand more fully all of the features it has I can definitely recommend this to intermediate learners looking to improve their article reading skills.

 

How Mondo works

I have reviewed other reading apps before as part of this series, but what sets this app aside from these others is that it offers a better reading experience for learners by including dictionary lookup and a flashcard feature amongst other things. I’ve outlined some of the app’s main features below:

 

  • Article reading. All articles have a word lookup function when you highlight a word or phrase and includes a recording of its pronunciation by a native speaker. You can toggle furigana on or off, and some articles have links to the English translation to check your understanding of the Japanese text.
  • Vocabulary lists. Words you come across in articles can be bookmarked, which then can be viewed later and added to a vocabulary list. There are also preset lists, with lists such as all levels of the JLPT, Joyo (general use) kanji and business-related language. You can then test yourself on this vocabulary in the form of electronic flashcards, Anki style. My only gripe with this is that with the preset lists testing from English to Japanese, the English terms can be so obtuse at times that coming up with the correct Japanese term can seem nearly impossible sometimes.

 

 

  • Handshake is a feature you can use to find Japanese language learning partners. You can choose a partner by swiping right on the people you are interested in chatting with – if you get a mutual handshake, you’ve just found a language exchange partner! The obvious similarities to Tinder here have put me off trying this feature out, but it could be a good alternative to a dedicated app like Hello Talk.
  • Study log. When reading articles, the app measures how long it takes you to read the article, and how long you have spent reading in total. It also measures Characters per Minute (CPM) which is used as a benchmark for what level the app considers your language learning level to be.

 

My thoughts on Mondo

I think that the above features packed into one app for free represents a really good deal. It is worth mentioning that there is a premium version of the app, which gives you access to audio recordings of each article (the free version lets you listen to one article every fortnight) as well as short dialogues by native speakers and costs 480 yen per month.

For 1800 yen per month, the premium membership also grants you access to Japanese language teachers who are there to help you out with any Japanese related questions you may have. Given the prices, I am not sure if the premium membership represents good value for money, but as a free app, I am impressed by its current offering.

If you are interested in checking the app out, it is available in the Apple store and Google Play storeYou can also find out more about the app on the official website.

 

PS. If you are on the lookout for a similar type of reading app, check my previous reviews:

‘Appy Mondays – TangoRisto

‘Appy Mondays – News Easy Japanese

‘Appy Mondays -NHK News Reader

 

Have you tried this app out? Are you aware of a better alternative? Let me know in the comments!

Tadoku – reading your way to Japanese fluency?

books-2241635_1920

Reading in Japanese is crucial for increasing your language skills. Especially if you are looking to study towards the JLPT, reading in Japanese on a regular basis is an essential habit. Reading speed for the JLPT becomes even more important at the higher levels, where being able to read quickly and pick out the key points is necessary to score highly.

Therefore as an avid reader, I was immediately drawn to the concept of tadoku (多読) when I happened across it some months ago. Developed in Japan as a way of improving English skills for non-native speakers, tadoku focuses on reading as much material as possible. Importantly, you read without getting hung up on unfamiliar words and phrases.

There are four golden rules for tadoku:

  1. Read something at your level
  2. Don’t use your dictionary
  3. Skip over the words and phrases you don’t understand
  4. If something is too difficult, stop reading it and read something else

 

Why is tadoku effective?

  • After a while, the context of the text you are reading helps to fill in the meaning of the words. Often we want to look up a word in a dictionary, and then work out what it means by reading the next sentence or two. Generally, 80% comprehension is enough to understand the remaining 20% through context.
  • You get a feel for what words and phrases appear more naturally in everyday language. Similarly, you learn common vocabulary when you read extensively in a specialist field.
  • Most importantly though, tadoku is supposed to be fun because you only read texts that you are motivated to finish.

Initially, I was skeptical of the idea of not needing to look up every word I did not know. However I decided to choose materials that were easy enough for me to follow but also things that I was genuinely interested in reading. That shift in thinking was enough for me to want to give tadoku a try.

Armed with a couple of really useful reading apps, I started looking for things to read. I mostly read novels, but I also enjoy reading manga from time to time. I often write about easy manga recommendations on the blog too.

Finding Japanese reading materials 

Free resources

My first thought was to look for reading materials where I already knew the story. Many people prefer translations of stories they are familiar with in English. With this in mind, I picked up translations of ‘Little Women’ and ‘The Great Gatsby’ from Aozora Bunko.

I recommend Aozora Bunko if you are looking for stories in Japanese to read for free, and I will be writing a follow-up post on how to make the most of this amazing resource. As great as Aozora Bunko is, the website is more than a little dauting for Japanese learners. I have written a few Author Spotlight posts which tend to feature authors whose works are on Aozora and are appropriate for Japanese learners.

However what has been most effective for me is to read books relating to films/ dramas I have watched. Examples of texts I have read include Nodame Cantabile, 1 Litre of Tears and A Silent Voice.

I’ve done a few posts on free online resources for Japanese reading which might help:

Buying physical books

The magic of tadoku is that you can read anything you want to read. If you want to read Harry Potter in Japanese, go ahead and order it!

Being in Japan certainly helps keep the costs down as second hand books can be bought online on from Book-Off very cheaply.

If you are outside of Japan like me, it’s a little bit more difficult. In terms of physical books, I normally look out for books on eBay or Amazon in my home country where possible for used books.

I know that CDJapanAmazon.jp and honto.jp ship internationally, although due to fairly high shipping costs it is advisable to buy in bulk to get the best value for money.

Buying digital books/ eBooks

If you prefer digital books, you have two book reading websites with companion apps at your disposal: ebookJapan and Bookwalker. I personally use both and can vouch for the convenience of being able to buy digital books and manga from outside Japan. You can pay with international cards on both websites, and with Bookwalker you can navigate both the website and the app in English.

If you are based in Japan, I would look into getting a Kindle ebook reader to read Japanese books digitally. I bought a Kobo reader in Japan and can buy ebooks for the device via the Rakuten Kobo store (I was living in Japan at the time, so I am not sure if this would work for others who are not in the country).

koboereader
My Kobo E-reader

The best thing about these two websites above is that you can try before you buy, by making use of the 立ち読み button. This allows you to read a sample of the book. I definitely recommend spending some time doing this before buying anything. You can save yourself a bit of money by first assessing the registers and the style of language used to see if it is appropriate for your language level.

Keep an eye out for my Manga Recommendation posts which may give you ideas of what you might like to read depending on your current level.

 

Tracking your reading in Japanese

If you are using an ebook reader, you will already be able to check your stats on how much you have read. However, if you are reading physical books, you may find using a website like Bookmeter helpful.

Bookmeter is basically the Japanese version of Goodreads. You can put together lists of books you are reading or would like to read and post reviews. As you register more books, you get recommendations on books based on what you have already read and enjoyed. The website is all in Japanese so I would recommend this website more for intermediate to advanced learners.

There are tadoku contests if you are planning on trying to read extensively and would like to compete against others.

 

How have I been getting on so far?

Initially my focus was to try and read as far as I could get on my train journey to work. At first, it was quite difficult, having started a new book (死神の制度 by Isaka Kotaro) and progress was slow. After a few days, I had sped up considerably. I felt like I was enjoying the book for its content rather than stressing about reading a book in Japanese!

For me, the best thing about trying this method has been to remind me of how far I’ve come with my language learning. Tadoku also gets you to enjoy native language materials without getting bogged down in the finer details of the language. After all, that’s why I started studying Japanese in the first place! My main goal in the short term is to keep reading regularly. Writing about what books I have read on the blog is also a good way to stay accountable.

Have you tried the tadoku technique? Are there any texts or resources you have found particularly useful for boosting your reading skills? Let me know in the comments.

Learn Japanese with Netflix?

learnjapanesewithnetflixblog

What if you could make your Netflix sessions more effective by learning Japanese at the same time? I’ve recently joined Netflix and it is turning out to be a pretty good resource for studying Japanese, even though I am not in Japan currently.

It turns out that there are quite a few Japanese TV dramas, anime series and films available internationally, with the list of Japanese language content increasing every week – great news for language learners!

Image result for netflix

How can Netflix be used for Japanese study?

The Japanese content on Netflix is a good way of working on your Japanese comprehension, as you can choose whether to have the English language subtitles on or off.

Changing the subtitles for shows on Netflix is simple: just look for the speech bubble icon in the bottom right corner of the play menu which will allow you to change the language of the subtitles displayed, or change the language of the show if there is more than one available.

Screenshot 2018-09-16 at 14.02.12

As you can see from the above, my Netflix is in Japanese, so the list of languages under 音声 (おんせい) refers to the audio language and 字幕(じまく) shows the language subtitle options.

Setting your home country to Japan changes the language of the interface to Japanese, but also gives you access to a greater number of Western shows with Japanese subtitles too.

The best ones to watch in terms of Japanese study are the Netflix originals (known as Netflixオリジナル作品) as you more often than not have the option to choose Japanese subtitles or Japanese closed caption (CC).

Here are a couple of ideas on how you can incorporate watching Netflix into your study routine (depending on your language level of course!):

  • You could watch a series that you already have watched in English and then rewatch with the Japanese subtitles. This helps you focus on how much of the language you can understand without looking anything up, as you are already familiar with the characters and story. The main advantage of using Japanese subtitles is that it will be much easier to pause and look up new words or phrases in the dictionary as and when you encounter them.
  • Watch using Japanese subtitles only, or try watching without any subtitles to really test your listening comprehension skills. Whilst this seems the most difficult and scary to do, the nature of TV will help fill in a lot of the important context of what is happening. It is also the best way to get used to the language being spoken at a natural speed (rather than at a slow speed as it tends to be in most language study materials).
  • Watch with dual subtitles. Chrome Extensions such as LLN: Language Learning with Netflix allow you to watch Netflix with two lots of subtitles. This gives you the opportunity to compare the two languages as you watch – the best of both worlds!

There’s a lot more to be said about subtitles and language learning, which I decided to cover in a separate post.

Pros and cons of using Netflix to study languages

Whilst I don’t always watch things more than once, I find that rewatching a series allows you to more accurately identify what aspects of the language you need to focus on (ie. is it vocabulary that is hindering your comprehension or is it grammar?) as you do not need to pay attention to the storyline as much. If it is not vocabulary or grammar, then it is often your listening comprehension letting you down.

What I find most useful about Netflix is that some videos can now be downloaded for offline viewing on the app which now makes it much easier to study on the go. The main downside with Netflix at the moment, however, is that there is not much in the way of variety: rom-com and food lovers, in particular, are likely to find something to enjoy here, but others may struggle.

I hope that more Japanese language content is to be added in the future; fortunately, there has been a steady stream of new content over the last few months. Netflix will notify you when content that relates to your interests is added.

One thing I’ve noticed which I hope will get fixed is that the subtitles are in white, which can be a bit tricky to see depending on the scene.

List of Japanese language content currently streaming on Netflix UK

I’ve compiled a list of Japanese language TV shows, films and anime that I’ve found on Netflix UK below (those that have options for Japanese/English or no language subtitles are given in brackets). I try to update this on a weekly basis!

NB: this does not include content that has been dubbed into English (eg. Pokemon X & Y, Yugi-oh!).

Dramas & TV

Ainori (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Atelier (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Blazing Transfer Students (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Erased (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Final Fantasy XIV: Dad of Light (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Good Morning Call [Seasons 1 & 2] (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Hibana: Spark (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Japanese Style Originator (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Jimmy: The True Story of a True Idiot (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Kakegurui [Live Action] (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Love and Fortune (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Love and Hong Kong (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

My Little Lover (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Midnight Diner: Tokyo Stories (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Million Yen Women (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Mob Psycho 100 (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Playful Kiss Season 1 (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Playful Kiss Season 2 (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

REA(L) OVE (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Re:Mind (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Samurai Gourmet (Japanese/ Japanese audio description/ English/ no subs)

Saboriman Kantarou (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Smoking [Season 1] (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Spiritual House (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Switched (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Terrace House: Boys and Girls in the City (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Terrace House: Aloha State (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Terrace House: Opening New Doors (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

The Could’ve-Gone-All-the-Way Committee (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

The Many Faces of Ito (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Anime

009 RE: Cyborg (English/ no subs)

A.I.C.O Incarnation (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Aggretsuko Season 1 (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Aggrestsuko: We Wish You a Metal Christmas (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Ajin: Demi Human (English/ no subs)

Aldnoah Zero (English/ no subs)

Angel Beats (English/ no subs)

Attack on Titan (English/ no subs)

Back Street Girls Gokudols (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Baki (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Batman Ninja (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Black Butler [Season 3] (English/ no subs)

Black Lagoon (English/ no subs)

Black Lagoon: Roberta’s Blood Trail (English/ no subs)

Bleach [Seasons 1-3] (English/ no subs)

Blood Lad (English/ no subs)

Blue Exorcist (English/ no subs)

B: The Beginning (Japanese / English/ no subs)

Case Closed (English/ no subs)

Children of the Whales (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Code Geass : Lelouch of the Rebellion (English/ no subs)

Cowboy Bebop (English/ no subs)

Cyborg 009: Call of Justice (Japanese audio description/ English/ no subs)

Cyborg 009 vs Devil Man (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Death Note (English/ no subs)

Devilman Crybaby [Season 1] (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Dragon Pilot (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Durarara!! (English/ no subs)

Elfen Lied (English/ no subs)

Erased (English/ no subs)

Eureka Seven Seasons 1 & 2 (English/ no subs)

Fate/ Apocrypha (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Fate/ EXTRA Last Encore Season 1 (Japanese CC/ English /no subs)

Fate/ Stay Night (English/ no subs)

Fate/ Stay Night unlimited Blade Works (English/ no subs)

Forest of Piano (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Fullmetal Alchemist (English/ no subs)

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood (English/ no subs)

Gunslinger Girl (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Gunslinger Girl –Il teatrino- (English/ no subs)

Gurren Lagann (English/ no subs)

Hero Mask (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Hi Score Girl (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Hunter X Hunter (English/ no subs)

ID-0 (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Kakegurui (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Kill la Kill (English/no subs)

Knights of Sidonia (English/ no subs)

Kuromukuro (Japanese/English/ no subs)

Last Hope [Parts 1 & 2] (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Little Witch Academia (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Lost Song (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Magi Adventure of Sinbad (Japanese/English/ no subs)

Mobile Suit Gundam UC (English/ no subs)

Mushi-shi (English/ no subs)

One Punch Man (English/ no subs)

Rurouni Kenshin (English/no subs)

Saint Seiya: The Lost Canvas (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Samurai Champloo (English/ no subs)

Samurai Flamenco (English/ no subs)

Seraph of the End: Vampire Reign (English/ no subs)

Sirius the Jaeger (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Space Dandy [Seasons 1 & 2] (English/ no subs)

Steins Gate [Season 1] (English/ no subs)

Sword Art Online (English/ no subs)

Sword Art Online II (English/ no subs)

Sword Gai (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Terror in Resonance (English/ no subs)

The Asterisk War Season 1 (English/ no subs)

The Disastrous Life of Saiki K Season 1 & 2 (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

The Seven Deadly Sins (English/ no subs)

Tokyo Ghoul (English/ no subs)

Trigun (English/ no subs)

Vampire Knight Season 1 & 2 (English/ no subs)

Violet Evergarden (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Your Lie in April (English/ no subs)

Yuki Yuna is a Hero (English/ no subs)

Films

A Silent Voice (English/ no subs)

Battle Royale (English/ no subs)

BLAME! (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Bleach [Live Action] (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Blue Exorcist: The Movie (English/ no subs)

Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods (English/ no subs)

Dragon Ball Z: Resurrection F (English/ no subs)

Fairy Tail: Dragon Cry (English/ no subs)

Fairy Tail: Phoenix Priestess (English/ no subs)

Fate/ Grand Order (English/ no subs)

Flavors of Youth: International Version (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Full Metal Alchemist [live action] (English/ no subs)

Fullmetal Alchemist: The Sacred Star of Milos (English/ no subs)

Garden of Words (English/ no subs)

Gantz: 0 (Japanese/English/ no subs)

Ghost Pain (English/ no subs)

Godzilla (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Godzilla: City on the Edge of Battle (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Godzilla The Planet Eater (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Halo Legends (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Harlock Space Pirate (English/ no subs)

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (English/ no subs)

Little Witch Academia: The Enchanted Parade (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Lupin III: The Castle of Caligostro (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Magi: The Labrinth of Magic (English/ no subs)

Manhunt (Japanese CC/ English/ no subs)

Persona 3 the Movie: #2 Midsummer Knights Dream (English/ no subs)

Steamboy (English/ no subs)

Sword Art Online The Movie: Ordinal Scale (English/ no subs)

The Birth of Sake (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

The Eternal Zero (English/ no subs)

The Many Faces of Ito [Live Action Movie] (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

The Seven Deadly Sins the Movie (Japanese/ English/ no subs)

Tokyo Ghoul: Jack (English/ no subs)

Tokyo Ghoul: Pinto (English/ no subs)

So is Netflix worth it for Japanese learners?

At this stage, there is not quite enough content for me to recommend subscribing purely for learning Japanese (there appears to be a good selection of Korean and Taiwanese dramas compared to Japanese content), but if you already have a subscription I definitely recommend checking the Japanese language stuff out.

Of the content I’ve watched, some of my favourites from the above list are Midnight Diner, My Little Lover and Jiro Dreams of Sushi. If you are interested in reading more about Japanese content on Netflix, check out this post where I write in greater depth about my top 8 TV shows, anime and films.

However, my absolute favourite TV show on Netflix, especially in terms of learning about Japanese language and culture is Japanese Style Originator’ as each episode focuses on different aspects of traditional Japanese culture. There are 54 episodes, some of which are up to 2 hours long so there is plenty to get your teeth stuck into!

What would be your recommendation for something to watch on Netflix? Have I missed anything from the above list? Let me know in the comments!

‘Appy Mondays – News Easy Japanese

The second installment for this series is a review of News Easy Japanese, another reading comprehension app.

News Easy Japanese (CLcosmos Ltd, free)

  News Easy Japanese- screenshot

This news reading comprehension app issues 3-4 articles each day covering current affairs, in the vein of NHK Easy Japanese, having been written using simpler language than standard newspaper articles but still use a lot of the vocabulary that does crop up.

Furigana can also be toggled on or off. Each article comes with sound clips where the article is clearly read and spoken at a steady speed facilitating easier reading comprehension. The items highlighted in green can be clicked on, and give simple definitions of the item in Japanese. I really like the Japanese-Japanese dictionary as it gives you the opportunity to understand new vocab using words you (hopefully) already know, and is especially useful for distinguishing between words which have appear to have similar English meanings.

  News Easy Japanese- screenshot

As you can see above, the app also has articles on various weather phenomena you may likely come across living in Japan (typhoons, tornadoes, heavy snow, heavy rain, tsunamis and earthquakes). This is useful for picking up relevant vocabulary relating to weather warnings which you may come across on TV. Being from the UK, earthquakes are not something I am used to, so having the opportunity to brush up on dealing with earthquakes is always helpful.

The only real downside of this app is that it does not have any offline functionality. Apart from that, I can definitely recommend this app to JLPT N3/ intermediate level learners looking to practice their newspaper reading comprehension, especially if you are looking to move away from Japanese-English dictionaries.

Rating: 4.5/5 stars 

 

‘Appy Mondays – NHK News Reader Review

Hello and Happy New Year! I hope 2017 will be a great year for all 🙂

Today’s post is the first of a new series called ‘Appy Mondays, where I will be reviewing some of the many Japanese language learning apps to see if they are worth using. This series will focus on apps available on Android as I do not own any Apple devices at present. I am also all about free or low cost apps whenever possible, and the cost will be factored into these reviews.

Today’s review is of NHK News Reader (AOVILL team, free)

 

How NHK News Reader works

This app provides access to the latest NHK articles, with additional functions suited for Japanese language learners. Articles are split by topic, but the main landing page will always show the main headlines.

Each article has the option to show furigana above kanji. Articles are accompanied by a video showing the corresponding item as read on Japanese TV, which is generally identical to the text (the text differs sometimes when people are interviewed and their speech has been paraphrased).

  NHK News Reader with Furigana- screenshot

As these videos are from Japanese TV, the speed is at a natural speed (ie. fast), so it is good for testing your comprehension of real Japanese. Article lengths do vary but the articles are for the most part not too long, and are best suited for a 15-30 minute reading session.

 

My thoughts on NHK News Reader

The option for furigana is always helpful for learners, but there is no integrated dictionary within the app. This would not be much of a problem if it wasn’t for the fact that the app does tend to freeze. I found that this always happened when I tried to switch apps to look a word up in the dictionary whilst in the middle of reading an article, the app screen would go blank when I returned to the app.

This is a shame because unless you have a physical dictionary to hand, you would, of course, be switching apps frequently. I often use my journey to work for studying Japanese for example and so this app would not be easy to use on my commute. Your device has to be connected to the internet to use the app, which makes sense as there are integrated videos, but it would have been nice to have the option to view the articles themselves offline.

I should say that the app is free, but there is a paid version for £3.99. However looking at the reviews for the paid version, the extra cost does not add functionality that I would be expecting, namely the ability to view articles offline and an integrated dictionary.

Overall, I think that as a free app it may be worth trying out if you are around JLPT N2 level and looking for authentic news articles and video to work on your newspaper reading comprehension. It is a decent free app, but I could not recommend it or its paid upgrade app as an essential resource for intermediate/ advanced learners with the bugs it currently has.

Update: if you are interested in other reading apps, I recommend TangoRisto or Mondo – both are free and improve upon a lot of the issues I had with this app!

Manga Recommendation: Cooking Papa

On the blog, I’m planning to introduce plenty of manga that Japanese learners may be interested in reading. The recommendations I make will usually be based on the difficulty of Japanese used, or the fact that it offers an interesting insight into Japanese culture. Generally, manga is best tackled when you reach about JLPT N3, although this can vary depending on the genre.

Today I would like to introduce Cooking Papa (クッキングパパ), a long-running manga series created by Tochi Ueyama.

Quick Facts

Author: Tochi Ueyama (うえやまとち)

Genre: Shounen, food

No. of volumes: 144

Recommended for: JLPT N3

Furigana: No

Anime/ drama/ film adaptations?: Yes, anime and drama adaptations

Plot Overview 

The main character is Kazumi Araiwa, a senior member of staff at a food business. At work he manages to strike a balance between getting work done and caring about the well-being of his colleagues, but what really catches his boss Higashiyama’s eye is his delicious homemade lunches, or bento (弁当)!

It turns out Kazumi’s wife is busy working as a journalist and is a terrible cook, so Kazumi is responsible for making his own bento. The manga spends a lot of time focusing on how Kazumi makes a series of amazing meals and lunches to treat his coworkers and family. 

Why do I recommend the manga?

Each volume contains a number of real-life recipes with hints and tips on how to bring out the best flavors. For example, the recipe for おにぎらず (Onigirazu, a kind of rice sandwich), has recently become a lunchtime favorite and there are plenty of videos on how to make it for yourself. This dish was first popularised in Japan after being published in Cooking Papa.

If you want to learn more about cooking in Japanese, this manga is a good way to familiarise yourself with relevant vocabulary such as:

煮る (にる/ niru) to boil, simmer

揚げる (あげる/ ageru) to deep fry

Handy recipes aside, I like how the manga has Kazumi (and his wife) somewhat breaking traditional gender stereotypes, whilst keeping a fun and lighthearted tone.  In addition, whilst there are over 130 volumes, each volume is episodic so you do not need to start from volume one. This also makes it a good choice for shorter reading sessions.

Recommended Japanese language level

 I would probably recommend this to someone about JLPT N3 or intermediate level. Having a fair bit of dialogue, it helps to be familiar with casual forms of Japanese. As the manga takes place both at Kazumi’s home and workplace, you get to learn more about the contrast in how Japanese is spoken in the office and when at home with family. 

The best way to get a feel for the manga is to try reading a sample. Fortunately, a lot of manga including Cooking Papa is available digitally.

You can read a sample of this manga on the EbookJapan website by clicking the blue ‘無料立ち読み’ button.

If you do try reading any of the recommendations, please let me know how you get on the comments. I am always on the hunt for beginner friendly manga, so if you have any suggestions please let me know!

If you like Cooking Papa, you might also like my other food-related manga recommendations:

Happy Reading!

%d bloggers like this: